Wednesday, June 1, 2022

Prajnaparamita-10K - Chapter 01 - The Context - 251

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Analysis of "The Transcendent Perfection of Wisdom
in Ten Thousand Lines" - 251
Daśa­sāhasrikā­prajñā­pāramitā

– Chapter 01 - The Context –
[Not complete – Work in Progress]

https://read.84000.co/translation/UT22084-031-002.html


01. CONTEXT – "That which is called the transcendent perfection of wisdom is the absence of fixation / attachment with respect to all dharmas in both samsara & nirvana – physical, conceptual, mental –." Multiple examples are given in this chapter.

(From the Introduction: Chapter 1 & 2: In response to a question about what is the Transcendent Perfection of Wisdom which bodhisattvas are to perfect, Lord Buddha replies that it is the absence of fixation with respect to all phenomena, all meditative experiences, all causal attributes acquired by bodhisattvas, all fruitional attributes manifested by buddhas, and all attainments up to and including omniscience. Along with unconditioned phenomena, such as the abiding nature of all things and the finality of existence,
these are all attributes with respect to which a great bodhisattva being should cultivate detachment.
Bodhisattvas do perceive such phenomena distinctly, but only on the relative level [T1];
in an ultimate sense they consider them to be illusory, in the manner of a dream and so forth [T2] [U2T].)
-
(i.e. Bodhisattvas should act without acting – actions of the body, speech and mind –, in accord with valid conventional relative teachings / truths / methods / practices / goals [T1], but without any grasping / attachment / apprehension / obsession / fixation / reification / reference points / absolutes [T2] [U2T]; without falling into any extreme or middle; more and more in accord with the Middle Way: not accepting / affirming / seeking / adding / improving / doing anything in absolute terms, not rejecting / negating / abandoning / eliminating / subtracting / not-doing anything in absolute terms, just conventionally / relatively / inter-subjectively; thus more and more in accord with the transcendent perfection of wisdom; more and more in accord with the inconceivable true nature & dynamic of Reality as it is; more and more in accord with the inconceivable Union of the Two Truths [U2T / U2T-3S / U2T-opp / U2T-2T] beyond all extremes & middle, beyond all dualistic conceptual proliferations, beyond all defining limitations, beyond all conditioning / karma.
-
That is acting / perceiving conventionally / relatively [T1] but not really / ultimately [T2];
thus in accord with the Union of the Two Truths [U2T].)

1.­1

Homage to all the buddhas and bodhisattvas!


1.­2

Thus have I heard on a certain occasion. The Blessed One 16 was residing at Vulture Peak near Rāja­gṛha with a large monastic gathering comprising many thousands of fully ordained monks. All of them were arhats who had attained the cessation of contaminants and were without afflicted mental states, fully controlled, their minds thoroughly liberated, their wisdom well liberated, thoroughbreds, mighty nāgas, their tasks accomplished, their work completed, their burdens relinquished, their own objectives already fulfilled, the fetters binding them to the rebirth process completely severed, their minds thoroughly liberated through their genuine understanding, having perfected the highest of all mental faculties, with the exception of one person ‍— the venerable Ānanda, a disciple who had merely entered the stream. Also present were some five hundred fully ordained nuns, laymen, and laywomen, all of whom had seen the truth. 17


1.­3

There, too, were many thousands of great bodhisattva beings, all of whom had mastered the dhāraṇīs and attained the meditative stabilities, 18 and were abiding in emptiness, their perceptual range being one of signlessness, their aspirations free from discrimination, their attainments the acceptance of sameness and inspired eloquence that was unimpeded. Indeed they all had the five extrasensory powers 19 and captivating speech. Their ethical conduct was without artificiality and they had no thoughts of ulterior profit, acquisition, or fame.


1.­4

They could teach the sacred doctrine, free from worldliness. They had perfected their acceptance of the profound nature of phenomena; they had acquired assurance and completely gone beyond demonic activities. Liberated from all obscurations associated with past actions, they had accumulated merits by teaching the sacred doctrine, extensively accumulating their aspirations over countless eons. [F.2.a] Their speech was honest with a smiling demeanor, their countenances without frowns of anger. They possessed the assurance that overwhelms endless assemblies. They were skilled in their emancipation from cyclic existence, as they had demonstrated for many tens of millions of eons.


1.­5

They regarded phenomena as a magical display, a mirage, a dream, the moon reflected in water, an optical aberration, empty space, an echo, a castle in the sky, or a phantom, and they were endowed with immeasurable assurance. They were skilled in comprehending the mental attitudes and interests of all sentient beings, and the knowledge that engages in subtlety. 20 Toward all sentient beings their attitude was without any animosity and imbued with great tolerance. They were skilled in definitively introducing them to the nature of reality. They held them in their aspirations for infinite buddhafields. At all times they uninterruptedly actualized the meditative stability that recollects the buddhas of countless world systems. They were well-versed in questioning the innumerable buddhas, and skillful in the abandoning of afflicted mental states motivated by diverse mistaken views. They were all bodhisattvas who knew how to actualize one hundred thousand emanational displays by means of their meditative stability.


1.­6

Among them were the following: 21 the great being Bhadra­pāla, along with Ratnā­kara, Sārtha­vāha, Nara­datta, Graha­datta, 22 Varuṇa­datta, Indra­datta, Uttara­mati, Vi­śeṣa­mati, Vardhamāna­mati, A­mogha­darśin, Su­saṃ­prasthita, Su­vikrānta­vikrāmin, Nityodyukta, Anikṣiptadhura, Sūrya­garbha, Candra­garbha, An­upama­cintin, Avalokiteśvara, Mañjuśrī, Ratna­mudrā­hasta, the bodhisattva Nityotkṣipta­hasta and the great bodhisattva being Maitreya, [F.2.b] heading many thousands of accompanying bodhisattvas, all of whom were youthful in appearance.


1.­7

At that time, the Blessed One outshone Śakra, Brahmā, and all the worldly protectors. Then, in the presence of these four assemblies, he demonstrated multiple miraculous forms, vivid, brilliant and distinct, which were emanated through his magical abilities. Also, from all the pores of his body, an effulgence of light rays shone forth ‍— many hundreds of billion trillions in number.


1.­8

Thereupon, the venerable Śāradvatī­putra, who was present within the assembly, observed those miraculous forms emanated through the miraculous abilities of the Tathā­gata. He was delighted. He rejoiced. His extreme joy gave rise to such delight and contentment that, rising from his seat, with his upper robe over one shoulder, he rested his right knee on the ground and placed his hands together in the gesture of homage, facing in the direction of Blessed One, while asking the Blessed One as follows: "If I might be permitted to request the Reverend Lord to pronounce on them, may I put certain questions to the Reverend Lord?"


The Blessed One then replied to the venerable Śāradvatī­putra, "Śāradvatī­putra, since you always have had opportunities to question the Tathā­gata, you may ask whatever you wish, and you should be satisfied with the answers to your questions."


1.­9 [QUESTION: What is the transcendent perfection of wisdom]

The venerable Śāradvatī­putra then asked the Blessed One,

"Reverend Lord, with regard to that which is called the transcendent perfection of wisdom, 23 Reverend Lord,
what exactly is the transcendent perfection of wisdom of the bodhisattvas?
By perfecting what sacred doctrine do bodhisattvas
perfect the transcendent perfection of wisdom and swiftly attain manifestly perfect buddhahood in unsurpassed, genuinely perfect enlightenment?" [F.3.a]


Thereupon, the Blessed One inspired the venerable Śāradvatī­putra with the words, "Excellent, Śāradvatī­putra! Excellent! Excellent! Through the blessings of the Tathā­gata you have made a splendid request. You have had an excellent idea! To that end, you should listen carefully, keep my words in mind, and I shall teach the transcendent perfection of wisdom."


"Reverend Lord, so be it!" he replied.


1.­10 [ANSWERS: It is having no fixation /attachment with respect to all things]

-
So it was that the venerable Śāradvatī­putra listened to the Blessed One, and the Lord replied,

"Śāradvatī­putra,
that which is called the transcendent perfection of wisdom is the absence of fixation with respect to all things.
Śāradvatī­putra, bodhisattvas who are without fixation perfect the transcendent perfection of wisdom, and will indeed swiftly attain manifestly perfect buddhahood in unsurpassed and genuinely perfect enlightenment."

(i.e. Bodhisattvas may use without using valid conventional / relative words, concepts, truths, teachings, views, methods, practices, goals, adapted skillful means [T1] … but without any grasping / attachment / apprehension / obsession / fixation / reification / reference points / absolutes [T2] [U2T]; without falling into any extreme or middle; more and more in accord with the Middle Way: not accepting / affirming / seeking / adding / improving / doing anything in absolute terms, not rejecting / negating / abandoning / eliminating / subtracting / not-doing anything in absolute terms, just conventionally / relatively / inter-subjectively; thus more and more in accord with the transcendent perfection of wisdom; more and more in accord with the inconceivable true nature & dynamic of Reality as it is; more and more in accord with the inconceivable Union of the Two Truths [U2T / U2T-3S / U2T-opp / U2T-2T] beyond all extremes & middle, beyond all dualistic conceptual proliferations, beyond all defining limitations, beyond all conditioning / karma. Why? Because the true nature & dynamic as it is of all dharmas is like a Union of being empty of inherent existence [T2], not really existent / caused / functional <==> because of being conventionally dependently co-arisen (interdependent) relatively functional ever-changing / impermanent appearances [T2], merely labeled / imputed by the mind [U3S] in dependence of its conditioning / karma, not completely non-existent / non-caused / non-functional / useless / meaningless. And vice versa; one aspect / truth implies / proves / enables the other (<==>) [U2T - Union of the Two Truths about all dharmas]. They could be co-dependent with their parts & wholes (when applicable), with their causes & conditions & effects (when applicable), with their conceptual opposites (always), and especially co-dependent with the mind merely labeling / imputing them (always) – co-dependent with the mind, but not from the mind-only, not the mind-only. All dharmas are: not existent / caused / functional, not non-existent / non-caused / non-functional, not both together, not neither; not different / separate / multiple / dual, not identical / united / one / non-dual, not both together, not neither; not permanent / continuous / eternal, not impermanent / discontinuous / annihilated, not both together, not neither; not dependent, not independent, not both together, not neither; not empty, not non-empty, not both together, not neither; not dependently arisen, not empty of inherent existence, not both together, not neither; not equal / pure / perfect / divine / complete / free / enlightened, not  unequal / impure / imperfect / ordinary / incomplete / bounded / unenlightened, not both together, not neither; not this, not non-this, not both together, not neither – for whatever 'this’ is. Meaning inconceivable.)


1.­11 [Question: What 'all things' means:]

-
Then he asked, "Reverend Lord, what are all those things on which great bodhisattva beings 24 should not be fixated?"


[Answer: 'All things' covers all traditional Abhidharma's topics: They are all valid useful conventional / relative words / concepts / teachings / truths / methods / practices goals [T1] …, but ultimately all empty of inherent existence [T2] [U2T]. Like illusions / reflections / mirages / dreams: 'There, but not there." [U2T]. Not existent / caused / functional, not non-existent / non-caused / non-functional / useless / meaningless, not both together, not neither; not to be accepted / affirmed / sought / done in absolute terms, not to be completely rejected / negated / abandoned / eliminated / not-done in absolute terms, not both together, not neither.]

-
The Blessed One replied, "Śāradvatī­putra,
the expression 'all things' denotes the following:

  1. the five psycho-physical aggregates, (i.e. Union of the Two Truths about the five aggregates.)

  2. the twelve sense fields,

  3. the eighteen sensory elements,

  4. the four noble truths,

  5. the twelve links of dependent origination, (i.e. Union of the Two Truths about the twelve links of dependent origination.)

  6. the four applications of mindfulness,

  7. the four correct exertions,

  8. the four supports for miraculous ability,

  9. the five faculties,

  10. the five powers,

  11. the seven branches of enlightenment,

  12. the noble eightfold path,

  13. the emptiness that is a gateway to liberation, (i.e. Union of the Two Truths about the three Gateways of Liberation.)

  14. the signlessness that is a gateway to liberation,

  15. the aspirationlessness that is a gateway to liberation,

  16. the four meditative concentrations,

  17. the four immeasurable aspirations, (i.e. Union of the Two Truths about all virtuous methods / practices.)

  18. the four formless meditative absorptions,

  19. the eight aspects of liberation,

  20. the nine serial steps of meditative absorption,

  21. the nine contemplations of impurity,

  22. the ten recollections,

  23. the six aspects of perception, [F.3.b]

  24. the knowledge of phenomena, (i.e. Union of the Two Truths about all forms of knowledge.)

  25. the subsequent knowledge,

  26. the knowledge of other minds,

  27. the knowledge of relative appearances,

  28. the knowledge of suffering,

  29. the knowledge of the origin of suffering,

  30. the knowledge of the cessation of suffering,

  31. the knowledge of the path,

  32. the knowledge of the extinction of contaminants,

  33. the knowledge that contaminants will not be regenerated,

  34. the knowledge that is definitive, and similarly,

  35. the meditative stability endowed with ideation and scrutiny,

  36. the meditative stability free from ideation and merely endowed with scrutiny,

  37. the meditative stability free from both ideation and scrutiny,

  38. the faculties that will enable knowledge of all that is unknown,

  39. the faculties that acquire the knowledge of all things,

  40. the faculties endowed with the knowledge of all things,

  41. the eight sense fields of mastery,

  42. the ten sense fields of total consummation,

  43. the eighteen aspects of emptiness, (i.e. Union of the Two Truths about the two truths themselves.)

  44. the ten powers of the tathāgatas,

  45. the four assurances,

  46. the four kinds of exact knowledge,

  47. great loving kindness, great compassion,

  48. the eighteen distinct qualities of the buddhas, and likewise,

  49. the understanding of all phenomena,

  50. the understanding of the aspects of the path,

  51. the understanding of omniscience,

  52. the six transcendent perfections, (i.e. Union of the Two Truths about all virtuous methods / practices.)

  53. the five extrasensory powers, 25

  54. the five eyes,

  55. the thirty-two major marks of a superior man, and

  56. the eighty excellent minor marks. 26 (i.e. Union of the Two Truths about the three Jewels / three kayas.)

All these are the things on which great bodhisattva beings should not be fixated.
One who is without fixation perfects the transcendent perfection of wisdom and will also swiftly attain manifestly perfect buddhahood in unsurpassed and genuinely perfect enlightenment."

(i.e. Bodhisattvas may use without using valid conventional / relative words, concepts, truths, teachings, views, methods, practices, goals, adapted skillful means [T1] … but without any grasping / attachment / apprehension / obsession / fixation / reification / reference points / absolutes [T2] [U2T]; without falling into any extreme or middle; more and more in accord with the Middle Way: not accepting / affirming / seeking / adding / improving / doing anything in absolute terms, not rejecting / negating / abandoning / eliminating / subtracting / not-doing anything in absolute terms, just conventionally / relatively / inter-subjectively; thus more and more in accord with the transcendent perfection of wisdom; more and more in accord with the inconceivable true nature & dynamic of Reality as it is; more and more in accord with the inconceivable Union of the Two Truths [U2T / U2T-3S / U2T-opp / U2T-2T] beyond all extremes & middle, beyond all dualistic conceptual proliferations, beyond all defining limitations, beyond all conditioning / karma. Why? Because the true nature & dynamic as it is of all dharmas is like a Union of being empty of inherent existence [T2], not really existent / caused / functional <==> because of being conventionally dependently co-arisen (interdependent) relatively functional ever-changing / impermanent appearances [T2], merely labeled / imputed by the mind [U3S] in dependence of its conditioning / karma, not completely non-existent / non-caused / non-functional / useless / meaningless. And vice versa; one aspect / truth implies / proves / enables the other (<==>) [U2T - Union of the Two Truths about all dharmas]. They could be co-dependent with their parts & wholes (when applicable), with their causes & conditions & effects (when applicable), with their conceptual opposites (always), and especially co-dependent with the mind merely labeling / imputing them (always) – co-dependent with the mind, but not from the mind-only, not the mind-only. All dharmas are: not existent / caused / functional, not non-existent / non-caused / non-functional, not both together, not neither; not different / separate / multiple / dual, not identical / united / one / non-dual, not both together, not neither; not permanent / continuous / eternal, not impermanent / discontinuous / annihilated, not both together, not neither; not dependent, not independent, not both together, not neither; not empty, not non-empty, not both together, not neither; not dependently arisen, not empty of inherent existence, not both together, not neither; not equal / pure / perfect / divine / complete / free / enlightened, not  unequal / impure / imperfect / ordinary / incomplete / bounded / unenlightened, not both together, not neither; not this, not non-this, not both together, not neither – for whatever 'this’ is. Meaning inconceivable.)


1.­12 [ASKING FOR DETAILS:]

Then the venerable Śāradvatī­putra asked the Blessed One, "Reverend Lord,
what are the 'five psycho-physical aggregates'
and likewise [those other phenomena],
up to and including the 'twelve links of dependent origination'?
What are the 'four applications of mindfulness',
and likewise [those other causal attributes] up to and including the 'noble eightfold path'?
What is the 'emptiness that is a gateway to liberation,'
and likewise [those other attainments], up to and including 'omniscience'?
What are the 'six transcendent perfections,' [F.4.a]
and likewise [those other fruitional attributes], up to and including the 'eighty minor marks'?"


1.­13 [GIVING DETAILS:]

Thereupon, the Blessed One addressed the venerable Śāradvatī­putra as follows:

"Śāradvatī­putra, the 'five psycho-physical aggregates' comprise (i.e. Union of the Two Truths about the five aggregates.)

  1. physical forms,

  2. feelings,

  3. perceptions,

  4. formative predispositions, and

  5. consciousness.


1.­14

"If you ask what are the 'twelve sense fields,' they comprise six that are inner and six that are outer.
These are called the twelve sense fields.

Among them, if you ask what are the 'six inner sense fields,' they comprise

  1. the sense field of the eyes,

  2. the sense field of the ears,

  3. the sense field of the nose,

  4. the sense field of the tongue,

  5. the sense field of the body, and

  6. the sense field of the mental faculty.

These are called the six inner sense fields.


1.­15

"Then, if you ask what are the 'six outer sense fields,' they comprise

  1. the sense field of sights,

  2. the sense field of sounds,

  3. the sense field of odors,

  4. the sense field of tastes,

  5. the sense field of tangibles, and

  6. the sense field of mental phenomena.

These are called the six outer sense fields. 27


1.­16

"If you ask what are the 'eighteen sensory elements,' they comprise

  1. the sensory element of the eyes,

  2. the sensory element of sights, and

  3. the sensory element of visual consciousness;

  4. the sensory element of the ears,

  5. the sensory element of sounds, and

  6. the sensory element of auditory consciousness;

  7. the sensory element of the nose,

  8. the sensory element of odors, and

  9. the sensory element of olfactory consciousness;

  10. the sensory element of the tongue,

  11. the sensory element of tastes, and

  12. the sensory element of gustatory consciousness;

  13. the sensory element of the body,

  14. the sensory element of tangibles, and

  15. the sensory element of tactile consciousness; and

  16. the sensory element of the mental faculty,

  17. the sensory element of mental phenomena, and

  18. the sensory element of mental consciousness.

These are called the eighteen sensory elements.28


1.­17

"If you ask what are the 'four noble truths,' they comprise

  1. the noble truth of suffering,

  2. the noble truth of the origin of suffering,

  3. the noble truth of the cessation of suffering, and

  4. the noble truth of the path.

These are called the four noble truths. 29


1.­18

"If you ask what are the 'twelve links of dependent origination,' (i.e. Union of the Two Truths about the twelve links of dependent origination.)
they comprise

  1. fundamental ignorance, contingent on which

  2. formative predispositions arise;

  3. consciousness, which arises contingent on formative predispositions;

  4. name and form, which arise contingent on consciousness;

  5. the six sense fields, which arise contingent on name and form;

  6. sensory contact, which arises contingent on the six sense fields;

  7. sensation, which arises contingent on sensory contact; [F.4.b]

  8. craving, which arises contingent on sensation;

  9. grasping, which arises contingent on craving;

  10. [becoming] the rebirth process, which arises contingent on grasping;

  11. actual birth, which arises contingent on the rebirth process; and

  12. aging and death, along with sorrow, lamentation, suffering, mental discomfort, and agitation, which all arise contingent on actual birth.

It is in this way that these great corporeal aggregates, exclusively endowed with suffering, arise.


1.­19

"Conversely,

  1. through the cessation of fundamental ignorance, formative predispositions cease.

  2. Through the cessation of formative predispositions, consciousness ceases.

  3. Through the cessation of consciousness, name and form cease.

  4. Through the cessation of name and form, the six sense fields cease.

  5. Through the cessation of the six sense fields, sensory contact ceases.

  6. Through the cessation of sensory contact, sensation ceases.

  7. Through the cessation of sensation, craving ceases.

  8. Through the cessation of craving, grasping ceases.

  9. Through the cessation of grasping, the rebirth process ceases.

  10. Through the cessation of the rebirth process, actual birth ceases.

  11. Through the cessation of actual birth, aging and death cease; and

  12. through the cessation of aging and death, sorrow, lamentation, suffering, mental discomfort, and agitation all cease.

It is in this way that these corporeal aggregates, exclusively endowed with suffering, cease.


"These two processes are respectively said to follow and reverse the sequence in which the twelve links of dependent origination arise. 30


1.­20

"If you ask what are the 'four applications of mindfulness,' they comprise

  1. the application of mindfulness which, with regard to the physical body, observes the physical body;

  2. the application of mindfulness which, with regard to feelings, observes feelings;

  3. the application of mindfulness which, with regard to the mind, observes the mind; and

  4. the application of mindfulness which, with regard to phenomena, observes phenomena.

These are called the four applications of mindfulness. 31


1.­21

"If you ask what are the 'four correct exertions,'

  1. great bodhisattva beings resolve, struggle, strive, persevere with tenacity, and rightly aspire that negative and non-virtuous attributes which have not yet arisen might not be developed;

  2. they resolve, struggle, strive, persevere with tenacity, and rightly aspire that negative and non-virtuous attributes which have previously arisen might be renounced; [F.5.a]

  3. they resolve, struggle, strive, persevere with tenacity, and rightly aspire that virtuous attributes which have not yet arisen might be developed; and

  4. they resolve, struggle, strive, persevere with tenacity, and rightly aspire that virtuous attributes which have previously arisen might remain, be unforgotten, flourish, and reach complete perfection in the future, through cultivation.

These are called the four correct exertions.


1.­22

"If you ask what are the 'four supports for miraculous abilities,' they comprise

  1. the support for miraculous ability combining the meditative stability of resolution with the formative force of exertion,

  2. the support for miraculous ability combining the meditative stability of perseverance with the formative force of exertion,

  3. the support for miraculous ability combining the meditative stability of mind with the formative force of exertion, and

  4. the support for miraculous ability combining the meditative stability of scrutiny with the formative force of exertion.

These are called the four supports for miraculous ability.


1.­23

"If you ask what are the 'five faculties,' they comprise

  1. the faculty of faith,

  2. the faculty of perseverance,

  3. the faculty of recollection,

  4. the faculty of meditative stability, and

  5. the faculty of wisdom.

These are called the five faculties.


1.­24

"If you ask what are the 'five powers,' they similarly comprise

  1. the power of faith,

  2. the power of perseverance,

  3. the power of recollection,

  4. the power of meditative stability, and

  5. the power of wisdom.

These are called the five powers.


1.­25

"If you ask what are the 'seven branches of enlightenment,' they comprise

  1. the branch of enlightenment that entails correct recollection,

  2. the branch of enlightenment that entails correct doctrinal analysis,

  3. the branch of enlightenment that entails correct perseverance,

  4. the branch of enlightenment that entails correct delight,

  5. the branch of enlightenment that entails correct mental and physical refinement,

  6. the branch of enlightenment that entails correct meditative stability, and

  7. the branch of enlightenment that entails correct equanimity.

These are called the seven branches of enlightenment.


1.­26

"If you ask what is the 'noble eightfold path,' it comprises

  1. correct view,

  2. correct ideation,

  3. correct speech,

  4. correct action, [F.5.b]

  5. correct livelihood,

  6. correct effort,

  7. correct recollection, and

  8. correct meditative stability.

These are the branches of the noble eightfold path.


1.­27 [The Three Gates of Liberation: emptiness / śūnyatā, signlessness / animitta, and wishlessness / apraṇihita]

"If you ask what is 'emptiness as a gateway to liberation,' the state of mind which discerns that all things are empty of their own defining characteristics is emptiness as a gateway to liberation.

This is called emptiness as a gateway to liberation. (i.e. Union of the Two Truths about the three Gateways of Liberation.)


1.­28

"If you ask what is 'signlessness as a gateway to liberation,' the state of mind which discerns in all respects that all things are signless in terms of their own defining characteristics is signlessness as a gateway to liberation.

This is called signlessness as a gateway to liberation.


1.­29

"If you ask what is 'aspirationlessness as a gateway to liberation,' the state of mind in which all things are not formed, and there is nothing to be formed, is aspirationlessness as a gateway to liberation.

This is called aspirationlessness as a gateway to liberation. 32


1.­30

"If you ask what are the 'four meditative concentrations,' they are as follows:

  1. Bodhisattvas achieve and maintain the first meditative concentration where there is freedom from desires, and freedom from negative and non-virtuous attributes, while ideation and scrutiny are present, alongside the joy and bliss that arise from freedom.

  2. They achieve and maintain the second meditative concentration where there is an intense inner clarity, free from both ideation and scrutiny, the absence of ideation and scrutiny being due to one-pointed mental focus, while the joy and bliss that arise from meditative stability are present.

  3. They achieve and maintain the third meditative concentration where joy is absent, abiding in equanimity due to the absence of attachment to joy, while both mindfulness and alertness are present and bliss is experienced by the body. This is what sublime beings describe as 'mindful, blissful, abiding in bliss, and equanimous.'

  4. They achieve and maintain the fourth meditative concentration where even that sense of bliss is abandoned and former states of suffering have also been eliminated. Here, neither suffering nor bliss is present because blissful and unhappy states of mind have both subsided, [F.6.a] while equanimity and mindfulness are utterly pure.

These are called the four meditative concentrations. 33


1.­31

"If you ask what are the 'four immeasurable aspirations,' (i.e. Union of the Two Truths about all virtuous methods / practices.)
they comprise

  1. loving kindness,

  2. compassion,

  3. empathetic joy, and

  4. equanimity.

These are called the four immeasurable aspirations.


1.­32

"If you ask what are the 'four formless meditative absorptions,' they comprise

  1. the meditative absorption of the sense field of infinite space,

  2. the meditative absorption of the sense field of infinite consciousness,

  3. the meditative absorption of the sense field of nothing-at-all, and

  4. the meditative absorption of neither perception nor non-perception.

These are called the four formless meditative absorptions.


1.­33

"If you ask what constitute the 'eight aspects of liberation,' they are as follows:

  1. The first aspect of liberation ensues when corporeal beings observe physical forms [in order to compose the mind].

  2. The second aspect of liberation ensues when formless beings endowed with internal perception observe external physical forms.

  3. The third aspect of liberation ensues when beings are inclined toward pleasant states.

  4. The fourth aspect of liberation ensues when the perceptions of physical forms have been completely transcended in all respects, when the perceptions of obstructed phenomena have subsided, and the mind does not engage with diverse perceptions, so that one achieves and abides in the sense field of infinite space, thinking, 'Space is infinite.'

  5. The fifth aspect of liberation ensues when the sense field of infinite space has been completely transcended in all respects, and when one achieves and abides in the sense field of infinite consciousness, thinking, 'Consciousness is infinite.'

  6. The sixth aspect of liberation ensues when the sense field of infinite consciousness has been completely transcended in all respects, and one achieves and abides in the sense field of nothing-at-all, thinking, 'There is nothing at all.'

  7. The seventh aspect of liberation ensues when the sense field of nothing-at-all has been completely transcended in all respects, and one achieves and abides in the sense field of neither perception nor non-perception.

  8. The eighth aspect of liberation ensues when the sense field of neither perception nor non-perception has been completely transcended in all respects, and one achieves and abides in the cessation of all perceptions and feelings.

These are called the eight aspects of liberation. 34 [F.6.b]


1.­34

"If you ask what are the 'nine serial steps of meditative absorption,' they are as follows:

  1. The first meditative absorption ensues when one achieves and maintains the first meditative concentration, that is to say, when there is freedom from desires, and freedom from negative and non-virtuous attributes, while ideation and scrutiny are present, alongside the joy and bliss that arise from freedom.

  2. The second meditative absorption ensues when one achieves and maintains the second meditative concentration, that is to say, when there is an intense inner clarity, free from both ideation and scrutiny, the absence of ideation and scrutiny being due to one-pointed mental focus, while the joy and bliss that arise from meditative stability are present.

  3. The third meditative absorption ensues when one achieves and maintains the third meditative concentration, that is to say, when one abides in equanimity due to the absence of attachment to joy, while both mindfulness and alertness are present, and bliss is still experienced by the body. This is what sublime beings describe as 'mindful, blissful, abiding in bliss, and equanimous.

  4. The fourth meditative absorption ensues when one achieves and maintains the fourth meditative concentration, that is to say, when even that sense of bliss is abandoned and former states of suffering have also been eliminated. Here, neither suffering nor bliss is present because blissful and unhappy states of mind have both subsided, while equanimity and mindfulness are utterly pure.

  5. The fifth meditative absorption ensues when the perceptions of physical forms have been completely transcended in all respects, when the perceptions of obstructed, material phenomena have subsided, and the mind does not engage with diverse perceptions, so that one achieves and abides in the sense field of infinite space, thinking, 'Space is infinite.'

  6. The sixth meditative absorption ensues when the sense field of infinite space has been completely transcended in all respects, and when one achieves and abides in the sense field of infinite consciousness, thinking, 'Consciousness is infinite.'

  7. The seventh meditative absorption ensues when the sense field of infinite consciousness has been completely transcended in all respects, and one achieves and abides in the sense field of nothing-at-all, thinking, 'There is nothing at all.' [F.7.a]

  8. The eighth meditative absorption ensues when the sense field of nothing-at-all has been completely transcended in all respects, and one achieves and abides in the sense field of neither perception nor non-perception.

  9. The ninth meditative absorption ensues when the sense field of neither perception nor non-perception has been completely transcended in all respects, and one achieves and abides in the cessation of all perceptions and feelings.

These are called the nine serial steps of meditative absorption. 35


1.­35

"If you ask what are the 'nine contemplations of impurity,' they are as follows:

  1. contemplation of a bloated corpse,

  2. contemplation of a worm-infested corpse,

  3. contemplation of a bloody corpse,

  4. contemplation of a putrefied corpse,

  5. contemplation of a blue-black corpse,

  6. contemplation of a devoured corpse,

  7. contemplation of a dismembered corpse,

  8. contemplation of a skeleton, and

  9. contemplation of an immolated corpse.

These are called the nine contemplations of impurity.


1.­36

"If you ask what are the 'ten recollections,' they are as follows:

  1. recollection of the Buddha,

  2. recollection of the Dharma,

  3. recollection of the Saṅgha,

  4. recollection of ethical discipline,

  5. recollection of renunciation,

  6. recollection of the god realms,

  7. recollection of quiescence,

  8. recollection of respiration,

  9. recollection of physicality, and

  10. recollection of death.

These are called the ten recollections. 36


1.­37

"If you ask what are the 'six aspects of perception,' they are as follows:

  1. perception of impermanence,

  2. perception of suffering,

  3. perception of non-self,

  4. perception of unattractiveness,

  5. perception of death, and

  6. perception of disinterest in all mundane things.

These are called the six aspects of perception.


1.­38

"If you ask what is the 'knowledge of phenomena,' it is the limited understanding that the five psycho-physical aggregates are to be purified. This is called knowledge of phenomena. (i.e. Union of the Two Truths about all forms of knowledge.)


1.­39

"If you ask what is 'subsequent knowledge,' it is the understanding that the eye is impermanent, and, likewise, it is the understanding that the ears, nose, tongue, body, mental faculty, sights, sounds, odors, tastes, tangibles, and mental phenomena are all impermanent. [F.7.b] This is called subsequent knowledge.


1.­40

"If you ask what is the 'knowledge of other minds,' it is the absence of doubt with regard to phenomena associated with the minds and mental states of other sentient beings and other individuals. This is called knowledge of other minds.


1.­41

"If you ask what is the 'knowledge of relative appearances,' it is the understanding of the aspects of the path. This is called the knowledge of relative appearances.


1.­42

"If you ask what is the 'knowledge of suffering,' it is the understanding of how suffering arises and endures. That is called the knowledge of suffering.


1.­43

"If you ask what is the 'knowledge of the origin of suffering,' it is the understanding that the origin of suffering is to be abandoned. This is called knowledge of the origin of suffering.


1.­44

"If you ask what is the 'knowledge of the cessation of suffering,' it is the understanding that suffering has ceased. This is called knowledge of the cessation of suffering.


1.­45

"If you ask what is the 'knowledge of the path,' it is the understanding of the noble eightfold path. This is called knowledge of the path leading to the cessation of suffering.


1.­46

"If you ask what is the 'knowledge of the extinction of contaminants,' it is the understanding that desire, hatred, and delusion have ended. This is called the extinction of contaminants.


1.­47

"If you ask what is the 'knowledge that contaminants will not be regenerated,' it is the understanding that one will not subsequently be reborn among the living beings of phenomenal existence. This is called the knowledge that contaminants will not be regenerated.


1.­48

"If you ask what is the 'knowledge that is definitive,' it is the tathāgatas' gnosis of omniscience.

This is called the knowledge that is definitive.37


1.­49

"If you ask what are the 'faculties that will enable knowledge of all that is unknown,' they comprise the faculty of faith, the faculty of perseverance, the faculty of recollection, the faculty of meditative stability, and the faculty of wisdom, which individual trainees who have not attained actual realization acquire. These are called the faculties that will enable knowledge of all that is unknown. 38


1.­50

"If you ask what are the 'faculties that acquire the knowledge of all things,' they comprise the faculty of faith, the faculty of perseverance, the faculty of recollection, the faculty of meditative stability, and the faculty of wisdom, of which individual trainees who have attained actual realization partake. These are called the faculties that acquire the knowledge of all things. [F.8.a]


1.­51

"If you ask what are the 'faculties endowed with the knowledge of all things,' they comprise the faculty of faith, the faculty of perseverance, the faculty of recollection, the faculty of meditative stability, and the faculty of wisdom, of which tathāgatas, arhats, genuinely perfect buddhas partake. These are called the faculties endowed with the knowledge of all things. 39


1.­52

"If you ask what is the 'meditative stability endowed with ideation and scrutiny,' it denotes the first meditative concentration which is achieved and maintained when there is freedom from desires, and freedom from negative and non-virtuous attributes, while joy and bliss are present. This is called the meditative stability endowed with ideation and scrutiny.


1.­53

"If you ask what is the 'meditative stability free from ideation and merely endowed with scrutiny,' it denotes the interval between the first and second meditative concentrations. This is called the meditative stability free from ideation and merely endowed with scrutiny.


1.­54

"If you ask what is the 'meditative stability free from both ideation and scrutiny,' it denotes the meditative absorptions, starting from the first meditative concentration and continuing as far as the sense field of neither perception nor non-perception. This is called the meditative stability free from both ideation and scrutiny.


1.­55

"If you ask what are the 'eight sense fields of mastery,' they are as follows: 40

  1. The first sense field of mastery refers to the [miraculous] perceptual transformation that ensues when one who perceives inner forms regards lesser external forms, 41 along with excellent colors and inferior colors, understands these forms, having attained mastery over them, and sees them, having attained mastery over them.

  2. The second sense field of mastery refers to the [miraculous] perceptual transformation that ensues when one who perceives inner formlessness regards greater external forms, along with excellent colors and inferior colors, understands these forms, having attained mastery over them, and sees them, having attained mastery over them.

  3. The third sense field of mastery [refers to the miraculous perceptual transformation that] ensues when one who perceives inner formlessness regards blue external forms, blue colors, blue appearances, and blue reflections, such as [F.8.b] the blue [form], the blue color, the blue appearance, and the blue reflection of the flax blossom or excellent blue cloth from Vārāṇasī. In the same way, one who perceives inner formlessness regards blue external forms, blue colors, blue appearances, and blue reflections, [and understands these forms, having attained mastery over them, and sees them, having attained mastery over them]. 42

  4. The fourth sense field of mastery [refers to the miraculous perceptual transformation that] ensues when one who perceives inner formlessness regards yellow external forms, yellow colors, yellow appearances, and yellow reflections, such as the yellow [form], yellow color, yellow appearance, and yellow reflection of the cassia flower or excellent yellow cloth from Vārāṇasī. In the same way, one who perceives inner formlessness regards yellow external forms, yellow colors, yellow appearances, and yellow reflections, [and understands these forms, having attained mastery over them, and sees them, having attained mastery over them].

  5. The fifth sense field of mastery [refers to the miraculous perceptual transformation that] ensues when one who perceives inner formlessness regards red external forms, red colors, red appearances, and red reflections, such as the red [form], red color, red appearance, and red reflection of the pentapetes flower or excellent red cloth from Vārāṇasī. In the same way, one who perceives inner formlessness regards red external forms, red colors, red appearances, and red reflections, [and understands these forms, having attained mastery over them, and sees them, having attained mastery over them].

  6. The sixth sense field of mastery [refers to the miraculous perceptual transformation that] ensues when one who perceives inner formlessness regards white external forms, white colors, white appearances, and white reflections, such as the white [form], white color, white appearance, and white reflection of the [morning] star Venus [or excellent white cloth from Vārāṇasī]. In the same way, one who perceives inner formlessness regards white external forms, white colors, white appearances, and white reflections, [and understands these forms, having attained mastery over them, and sees them, having attained mastery over them].

  7. The seventh sense field of mastery ensues when the perceptions of physical forms have been completely transcended in all respects, when the perceptions of obstructed, material phenomena have subsided, [F.9.a] and the mind does not engage with diverse perceptions, so that one achieves and abides in the sense field of infinite space, thinking, 'Space is infinite.'

  8. The eighth sense field of mastery ensues when the sense field of infinite space has been completely transcended in all respects, and when one achieves and abides in the sense field of infinite consciousness, thinking, 'Consciousness is infinite.'43

These are called the eight sense fields of mastery.


1.­56

"If you ask what are the 'ten sense fields of total consummation,' they comprise

  1. the total consummation of the earth element,

  2. the total consummation of the water element,

  3. the total consummation of the fire element,

  4. the total consummation of the wind element,

  5. the total consummation of the space element,

  6. the total consummation of blueness,

  7. the total consummation of yellowness,

  8. the total consummation of redness,

  9. the total consummation of whiteness, and

  10. the total consummation of consciousness.

These are called the ten sense fields of total consummation.


[Through these successive meditative stabilities]

  1. considering all elements to be present in the earth element, all of them are transformed into a single element, which is exclusively the earth element;

  2. considering all elements to be present in the water element, all of them are transformed into a single element, which is exclusively the water element;

  3. considering all elements to be present in the fire element, all of them are transformed into a single element, which is exclusively the fire element;

  4. considering all elements to be present in the wind element, all of them are transformed into a single element, which is exclusively the wind element;

  5. considering all elements to be present in the space element, all of them are then transformed into a single element, which is exclusively the space element;

  6. considering all elements to be present in blueness, all of them are transformed into blueness;

  7. considering all elements to be present in yellowness, all of them are transformed exclusively into yellowness;

  8. considering all elements to be present in redness, all of them are transformed exclusively into redness;

  9. considering all elements to be present in whiteness, all of them are transformed exclusively into whiteness; and

  10. considering all elements to be present in consciousness, [F.9.b] all of them are transformed exclusively into consciousness.

In this way, earth, water, fire, wind, space, blueness, yellowness, redness, whiteness, and consciousness are all transformed exclusively into a single element.

These are called the sense fields of total consummation. It is because they intensify the production of their respective elements to the point of consummation that they are called sense fields of total consummation, and they are also known as sense fields of total consummation because each element is respectively transformed into all the others. 44


1.­57

"If you ask what are the 'eighteen aspects of emptiness,' (i.e. Union of the Two Truths about the two truths themselves.)
they comprise

  1. emptiness of internal phenomena,

  2. emptiness of external phenomena,

  3. emptiness of both external and internal phenomena,

  4. emptiness of emptiness,

  5. emptiness of great extent,

  6. emptiness of ultimate reality,

  7. emptiness of conditioned phenomena,

  8. emptiness of unconditioned phenomena,

  9. emptiness of the unlimited,

  10. emptiness of that which has neither beginning nor end,

  11. emptiness of non-dispersal,

  12. emptiness of inherent existence,

  13. emptiness of intrinsic defining characteristics,

  14. emptiness of all things,

  15. emptiness of non-apprehension,

  16. emptiness of non-entities,

  17. emptiness of essential nature, and

  18. emptiness of the essential nature of non-entities. 45

(Note: Genuine-emptiness free from all extremes & middle = Union of the Two Truths free from all extremes & middle.
So what we have here is eighteen 'Union of the Two Truths’: All of these phenomena are empty of inherent existence [T2], not really existent / caused / functional <==> but still valid conventional dependently co-arisen (interdependent) relatively functional ever-changing impermanent appearances / adapted skillful means [T1], merely labeled / imputed by the mind in dependence of its conditioning / karma, not completely non-existent / non-caused / non-functional. One aspect / truths implies / proves / enables the other (<==>) [U2T]. They could be co-dependent with their parts & wholes (when applicable), with their causes & conditions & effects (when applicable), with their conceptual opposites (always), and especially co-dependent with the mind merely labeling / imputing them (always) – co-dependent with the mind, but not from the mind-only, not the mind-only. So we can use them conventionally / relatively [T1], but without any grasping / attachment / apprehension / obsession / fixation / reification / reference points / absolutes [T2] [U2T] .)


1.­58

"If, among them, you ask what is the 'emptiness of internal phenomena,' the term 'internal phenomena' comprises the eyes, ears, nose, tongue, body, and mental faculty. Among them, the eyes are empty of the eyes because they do not endure and they do not disintegrate. If you ask why, it is because that is their very nature. Similarly, the ears, the nose, the tongue, the body, and the mental faculty are, respectively, empty of [the ears, the nose, the tongue, the body, and] the mental faculty, because they do not endure and they do not disintegrate. If you ask why, it is because that is their very nature.

That is what is called the emptiness of internal phenomena.


1.­59

"If you ask what is the 'emptiness of external phenomena,' the term 'external phenomena' comprises sights, sounds, odors, tastes, tangibles, and mental phenomena. Among them, sights are empty of sights because they do not endure and they do not disintegrate. [F.10.a] If you ask why, it is because that is their very nature. Similarly, sounds, odors, tangibles, and mental phenomena are, respectively, empty of [sounds, odors, tangibles, and] mental phenomena, because they do not endure and they do not disintegrate. If you ask why, that is because it is their very nature.

That is called the emptiness of external phenomena.


1.­60

"If you ask what is the 'emptiness of both external and internal phenomena,' the term 'external and internal phenomena' comprises the six inner sense fields and the six outer sense fields. Among them, internal phenomena are empty of internal phenomena because they do not endure and they do not disintegrate. If you ask why, it is because that is their very nature. External phenomena are also empty of external phenomena because they do not endure and they do not disintegrate. If you ask why, it is because it is their very nature.

That is called the emptiness of external and internal phenomena.


1.­61

"If you ask what is the 'emptiness of emptiness,' that emptiness which is the emptiness of all phenomena is also empty of the emptiness of all phenomena because it does not endure and does not disintegrate. If you ask why, it is because it is its very nature.

That is called the emptiness of emptiness.


1.­62

"If you ask what is the 'emptiness of great extent,' the eastern direction is empty of the eastern direction because it does not endure and does not disintegrate. If you ask why, it is because that is its very nature. The southern, western, northern, and four intermediate directions ‍— all eight ‍— are also similarly empty of themselves, and the zenith is empty of the zenith, while the nadir is empty of the nadir, because they do not endure and do not disintegrate. If you ask why, it is because it is their very nature.

That is called the emptiness of great extent.


1.­63

"If you ask what is the 'emptiness of ultimate reality,' the term 'ultimate reality' denotes nirvāṇa in the context of the 'emptiness of ultimate reality.' In this regard, nirvāṇa is empty of nirvāṇa because it does not endure and does not disintegrate. If you ask why, it is because it is its very nature.

That is called the emptiness of ultimate reality. [F.10.b]


1.­64

"If you ask what is the 'emptiness of conditioned phenomena,' this refers to the world system of desire, the world system of form, and the world system of formlessness, among which the world system of desire is empty of the world system of desire, and similarly, the world system of form is empty of the world system of form, and the world system of formlessness is empty of the world system of formlessness because they do not endure and do not disintegrate. If you ask why, it is because it is their very nature.

That is called the emptiness of conditioned phenomena.


1.­65

"If you ask what is the 'emptiness of unconditioned phenomena,' the term 'unconditioned phenomena' denotes anything that does not arise, that does not abide, that does not disintegrate, and that does not change into something else. In this regard, unconditioned phenomena are empty of unconditioned phenomena because they do not endure and do not disintegrate. If you ask why, it is because it is their very nature.

That is called the emptiness of unconditioned phenomena.


1.­66

"If you ask what is the 'emptiness of the unlimited,' the arising of anything [which has no limits] is utterly non-apprehensible because it does not endure and does not disintegrate. If you ask why, it is because it is its very nature.

That is called the emptiness of the unlimited.


1.­67

"If you ask what is the 'emptiness of that which has neither beginning nor end,' the coming to pass of anything [in cyclic existence that has no beginning or end] is utterly non-apprehensible because it does not endure and does not disintegrate. If you ask why, it is because it is its very nature. That is called the emptiness of that which has neither beginning nor end.


1.­68

"If you ask what is the 'emptiness of non-dispersal,' this denotes anything in which there is no dispersion. [Things are empty of non-dispersal] because they do not endure and do not disintegrate. If you ask why, it is because it is their very nature.

That is called the emptiness of non-dispersal.


1.­69

"If you ask what is the 'emptiness of inherent existence,' this denotes the true nature of all conditioned and unconditioned phenomena, which is not created by the śrāvakas, not created by the pratyekabuddhas, and not fashioned by the lord buddhas. [Inherent existence is empty of inherent existence] because it does not endure and does not disintegrate. If you ask why, it is because that is its very nature.

That is called the emptiness of inherent existence. [F.11.a]


1.­70

"If you ask what is the 'emptiness of all intrinsic defining characteristics,' this denotes the intrinsic defining characteristic of physical forms, which is the capacity to assume physical forms; the intrinsic defining characteristic of feelings, which is emotional experience; the intrinsic defining characteristic of perceptions, which is comprehensibility; the intrinsic defining characteristic of formative predispositions which is conditioning; and the intrinsic defining characteristic of consciousness, which is cognizance. It applies to the defining characteristics of conditioned phenomena [such as these], and similarly extends as far as the defining characteristics of unconditioned phenomena. All these intrinsic defining characteristics are empty of their own intrinsic defining characteristics because they do not endure and do not disintegrate. If you ask why, it is because it is their very nature.

That is called the emptiness of intrinsic defining characteristics.


1.­71

"If you ask what is the 'emptiness of all things,' the term 'all things' denotes the five psycho-physical aggregates, the twelve sense fields, the eighteen sensory elements, corporeal phenomena, formless phenomena, conditioned phenomena, and unconditioned phenomena. All such things are empty of all things because they do not endure and do not disintegrate. If you ask why, it is because it is their very nature.

That is called the emptiness of all things.


1.­72

"If you ask what is the 'emptiness of non-apprehension,' it is that which does not apprehend any phenomena at all. [Non-apprehension is empty of non-apprehension] because it does not endure and does not disintegrate. If you ask why, it is because that is its very nature.

That is called the emptiness of non-apprehension.


1.­73

"If you ask what is the 'emptiness of non-entities,' it is the non-apprehension of any entity, in anything whatsoever.

This is called the emptiness of non-entities.


1.­74

"If you ask what is the 'emptiness of essential nature,' it is the absence of any essential nature with respect to anything originating from combinations [of causes and conditions].

That is called the emptiness of essential nature.


1.­75

"If you ask what is the 'emptiness of the essential nature of non-entities,' it [too] is the absence of any essential nature in anything originating from combinations [of causes and conditions].

That is called the emptiness of the essential nature of non-entities.


1.­76

"Moreover, Śāradvatī­putra,
entities are empty of entities. [F.11.b]
Non-entities are empty of non-entities.
Essential nature is empty of essential nature.
Extraneous entities are empty of extraneous entities. 46


1.­77

"If you ask what are entities, the term 'entities' denotes the five psycho-physical aggregates, which comprise physical forms, feelings, perceptions, formative predispositions, and consciousness. In this regard, entities are empty of entities.


1.­78

"If you ask in what way non-entities are empty of non-entities, the term 'non-entities' denotes unconditioned phenomena. In this regard unconditioned phenomena are empty of unconditioned phenomena. Similarly, non-entities are empty of non-entities.47


1.­79

"If you ask in what way the essential nature is empty of the essential nature, the essential nature of all phenomena is not created by being known, it is not created by being seen, and it is not created by anything at all. In this way, the essential nature is said to be empty of the essential nature.48


1.­80

"If you ask in what way extraneous entities are empty of extraneous entities, whether the tathāgatas have appeared or whether the tathāgatas have not appeared, the abiding nature of all things, the expanse of reality, the maturity with respect to all things, the real nature, the incontrovertible real nature, the inalienable real nature, and the finality of existence ‍— all of these continue to abide. Anything that is empty of phenomena extraneous to these attributes may be called an extraneous entity that is empty of extraneous entities.


1.­81

"Śāradvatī­putra!
These are all attributes with respect to which a great bodhisattva being should cultivate detachment.
One who is without fixation will reach the transcendent perfection of wisdom, and swiftly attain manifestly perfect buddhahood in unsurpassed and genuinely perfect enlightenment." 49

(i.e. Bodhisattvas may use without using valid conventional / relative words, concepts, truths, teachings, views, methods, practices, goals, adapted skillful means [T1] … but without any grasping / attachment / apprehension / obsession / fixation / reification / reference points / absolutes [T2] [U2T]; without falling into any extreme or middle; more and more in accord with the Middle Way: not accepting / affirming / seeking / adding / improving / doing anything in absolute terms, not rejecting / negating / abandoning / eliminating / subtracting / not-doing anything in absolute terms, just conventionally / relatively / inter-subjectively; thus more and more in accord with the transcendent perfection of wisdom; more and more in accord with the inconceivable true nature & dynamic of Reality as it is; more and more in accord with the inconceivable Union of the Two Truths [U2T / U2T-3S / U2T-opp / U2T-2T] beyond all extremes & middle, beyond all dualistic conceptual proliferations, beyond all defining limitations, beyond all conditioning / karma. Why? Because the true nature & dynamic as it is of all dharmas is like a Union of being empty of inherent existence [T2], not really existent / caused / functional <==> because of being conventionally dependently co-arisen (interdependent) relatively functional ever-changing / impermanent appearances [T2], merely labeled / imputed by the mind [U3S] in dependence of its conditioning / karma, not completely non-existent / non-caused / non-functional / useless / meaningless. And vice versa; one aspect / truth implies / proves / enables the other (<==>) [U2T - Union of the Two Truths about all dharmas]. They could be co-dependent with their parts & wholes (when applicable), with their causes & conditions & effects (when applicable), with their conceptual opposites (always), and especially co-dependent with the mind merely labeling / imputing them (always) – co-dependent with the mind, but not from the mind-only, not the mind-only. All dharmas are: not existent / caused / functional, not non-existent / non-caused / non-functional, not both together, not neither; not different / separate / multiple / dual, not identical / united / one / non-dual, not both together, not neither; not permanent / continuous / eternal, not impermanent / discontinuous / annihilated, not both together, not neither; not dependent, not independent, not both together, not neither; not empty, not non-empty, not both together, not neither; not dependently arisen, not empty of inherent existence, not both together, not neither; not equal / pure / perfect / divine / complete / free / enlightened, not  unequal / impure / imperfect / ordinary / incomplete / bounded / unenlightened, not both together, not neither; not this, not non-this, not both together, not neither – for whatever 'this’ is. Meaning inconceivable.)


1.­82

This completes the first chapter from "The Transcendent Perfection of Wisdom in Ten Thousand Lines," entitled "The Context." 50 [B2]


Access to other chapters:

The Transcendent Perfection of Wisdom in 10k Lines
[Not complete – Work in Progress]


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